Posts Tagged ‘ shell

Fun with GMail, Google Voice, & Python

Lately I have been getting lots of Google Voice and GMail messages, and it can be a royal pain to go through and mark them all read on the web interfaces, so I threw together a couple of script that help to solve this problem from the shell for me.

gmail_mark_as_read:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import imaplib
obj = imaplib.IMAP4_SSL('imap.gmail.com', '993')
obj.login('charlie@charliemeyer.net', 'my_password')
obj.select('Inbox')
typ ,data = obj.search(None,'UnSeen')
try:
    obj.store(data[0].replace(' ',','),'+FLAGS','\Seen')
    print "Messages marked as read"
except:
    print "No messages to mark"

voice_mark_as_read:

#!/usr/bin/env python

from googlevoice import Voice,util

voice = Voice()
voice.login('charlie@charliemeyer.net', 'my_password')

while True :
    folder = voice.search('is:unread')
    if folder.totalSize <= 0 :
        break
    util.print_(folder.totalSize)
    for message in folder.messages:
        if not message.id:
            continue
        util.print_(message)
        message.mark(1)

Now, to tie it all together, a bash script:

mark_all_as_read:

#!/bin/bash

voice_file=/tmp/gvoice.$$.out
gmail_file=/tmp/gmail.$$.out

touch $voice_file
touch $gmail_file

echo "Marking text messages read"
~/bin/voice_mark_as_read &> $voice_file &
echo "Marking gmail messages read"
~/bin/gmail_mark_as_read &> $gmail_file &

wait

echo "GVoice:"
cat $voice_file
echo "GMail:"
cat $gmail_file

rm $gmail_file $voice_file

Now, I do not claim to be the original author of the first 2 scripts here, they were taken from various stack exchange posts and what not (I lost the URLs and I have modified the scripts, so unfortunately I cannot give due credit, but I will not take it for myself). The last bash script was my little work, and it does its job perfectly. I hope this helps someone else to fix the problem that I was also facing.

Automapping channel numbers to TiVo commands from the Ubuntu command line

In a previous post, I described how to control your TiVo from the Linux command line. I wanted to take it a bit further and make it easier to enter numeric IR codes to my TiVo. With some pointers from Alex Lambert, I came up with a solution that works on my Ubuntu 12.04 laptop.

I am assuming you followed the instructions in the previous post and have created the following symlinks:

lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  4 23:24 NUM0 -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  4 23:24 NUM1 -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  4 23:24 NUM2 -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  4 23:24 NUM3 -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  4 23:24 NUM4 -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  4 23:24 NUM5 -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  4 23:24 NUM6 -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  4 23:24 NUM7 -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  4 23:25 NUM8 -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  4 23:25 NUM9 -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  4 23:32 ENTER -> tivoircode

Now, the goal here is that simply entering the command such as “1695” will send the sequence NUM1;NUM6;NUM9;NUM5 to the TiVo. This can be accomplished using the same facility that Ubuntu uses to suggest packages to install when you issue a command from a package that is not currently installed. To do this, add the following to your ~/.bashrc:

function is_integer() {
    s=$(echo $1 | tr -d 0-9)
    if [ -z "$s" ]; then
        return 0
    else
        return 1
    fi
}

command_not_found_handle() {
        if is_integer $1; then
                for NUM in `echo $1 | fold -w1`
                do
                        NUM$NUM
                done
#               ENTER
        else
                if [ -x /usr/lib/command-not-found -o -x /usr/share/command-not-found/command-not-found ]; then
                if [ -x /usr/lib/command-not-found ]; then
                   /usr/bin/python /usr/lib/command-not-found -- "$1"
                   return $?
                elif [ -x /usr/share/command-not-found/command-not-found ]; then
                   /usr/bin/python /usr/share/command-not-found/command-not-found -- "$1"
                   return $?
                else
                   printf "%s: command not found\n" "$1" >&2
                   return 127
                fi
                fi

        fi
}

Now, when you enter an numeric integer value on your bash session, it will send it to your TiVo as a series of IR codes for each digit in the number. You can uncomment the final ENTER command if you wish for the enter button to be pressed when a number is finished being entered on the TiVo, but that is up to you. This function copies the body of the command_not_found_handle default function from /etc/bash.bashrc that ships with Ubuntu, so that non-integer commands are sent through the old mechanism and no functionality is lost.

Happy TiVo’ing

Remote control of a TiVo from the Linux command line

I’m a huge fan of TiVo brand DVRs, so much so that I own two of them for myself. That being said,  most of the time that I am watching TV, I also have my laptop open with me. Since I run Linux on my laptops, I knew there had to be a way to write a set of shell scripts to allow me to use my always open terminal to easily manipulate my TiVo.

This is the solution that I came up with:

Assume that ~/bin is on your PATH

Create ~/bin/tivoircode with the following contents:

#!/usr/bin/env python

#simple python script to send remote IR commands to a TiVo DVR
#this script should never be called directly, but rather via
#symbolic links to it
#
#Written by Charlie Meyer <charlie@charliemeyer.net>
#December 2012

import socket
import sys
import time
import os.path

#set this to the ip address of the tivo to control
tivo_address = "192.168.1.101"

sock = None

def connect():
    global sock
    global tivo_address
    try:
        sock = socket.socket()
        sock.settimeout(5)
        sock.connect((tivo_address, 31339))
        sock.settimeout(None)
    except Exception, msg:
        print msg

def disconnect():
    global sock
    sock.close()

def send_code(code):
    if not sock:
        connect()
    try:
        sock.sendall("IRCODE "+code+"\r")
        time.sleep(0.1)
    except Exception, msg:
        print msg

times = 1;
if(len(sys.argv) > 1):
    times = int(sys.argv[1])

for i in range(0,times):
    send_code(os.path.basename(sys.argv[0]))

disconnect()

This is the base script from which all others will inherit. Obviously you will need to change the variable at the top of the file to point to the IP address of the TiVo which you want to control.

Now, here comes the fun part. There are a series of symbolic links that need to be made. The name of the link is the raw IR code that is sent to the TiVo, and they all link back to the master script we just created. I have not added all of the remote functions to my environment, but rather only the ones that I regularly use:

lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 21:48 CLEAR -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 21:50 PAUSE -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 21:51 REPLAY -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 21:51 RIGHT -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 21:52 LEFT -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 21:52 UP -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 21:52 DOWN -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 21:54 PLAY -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 21:54 INFO -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 21:55 SELECT -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 21:56 ADVANCE -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 22:02 TIVO -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 22:03 WINDOW -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 22:04 CHANNELUP -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 22:04 CHANNELDOWN -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 22:04 THUMBSDOWN -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  3 22:04 THUMBSUP -> tivoircode
lrwxrwxrwx 1 chuck chuck   10 Dec  4 18:04 GUIDE -> tivoircode

To create each one of these, use the ln command, such as:

ln -s tivoircode PLAY

to link PLAY to tivoircode

You should now be able to use the command PLAY in your terminal to cause the TiVo to emulate a regular infrared remote control pressing the play button.

Based on research done online, the following IRCODE commands can be symlinked to my tivoricode script and work properly (should be self-explanatory):

UP
DOWN
LEFT
RIGHT
SELECT
TIVO
LIVETV
THUMBSUP
THUMBSDOWN
CHANNELUP
CHANNELDOWN
RECORD
DISPLAY
DIRECTV
NUM0
NUM1
NUM2
NUM3
NUM4
NUM5
NUM6
NUM7
NUM8
NUM9
ENTER
CLEAR
PLAY
PAUSE
SLOW
FORWARD
REVERSE
STANDBY
NOWSHOWING
REPLAY
ADVANCE
DELIMITER
GUIDE

I wanted to make it a little easier for me, since typing PLAY is probably harder than actually just pressing the play button on the physical remote. To solve this, I created a set of bash aliases that map shorthand commands to the symbolic links we just created. Here is what I added to my ~/.bashrc at the bottom:

#TiVO commands
alias info="INFO"
alias cl="CLEAR"
alias pa="PAUSE"
alias pu="PAUSE"
alias replay="REPLAY"
alias rw="REPLAY"
alias re="REPLAY"
alias down="DOWN"
alias d="DOWN"
alias up="UP"
alias u="UP"
alias left="LEFT"
alias l="LEFT"
alias right="RIGHT"
alias r="RIGHT"
alias play="PLAY"
alias pl="PLAY"
alias select="SELECT"
alias sel="SELECT"
alias ff="ADVANCE"
alias skip="ADVANCE"
alias tivo="TIVO"
alias zoom="WINDOW"
alias zm="WINDOW"
alias chup="CHANNELUP"
alias chu="CHANNELUP"
alias pgu="CHANNELUP"
alias pgup="CHANNELUP"
alias chdn="CHANNELDOWN"
alias chd="CHANNELDOWN"
alias pgdn="CHANNELDOWN"
alias pgd="CHANNELDOWN"
alias thumbsup="THUMBSUP"
alias thup="THUMBSUP"
alias thu="THUMBSUP"
alias thumbsdown="THUMBSDOWN"
alias thdn="THUMBSDOWN"
alias thd="THUMBSDOWN"
alias guide="GUIDE"
alias gu="GUIDE"

Now, i can use my TiVo from the konsole (via yakuake) that I always have running using commands such as `ff 6` to fast forward 6×30 seconds, `rw 3` to rewind 3×8 seconds, `pu` to pause, `pl` to play, etc etc etc

shoutout to Alex Lambert for his help pointing out some of the obvious to me